A Chair, Coffee and Wondering…

Damascus Chair

Upstairs in the library is a favourite chair of mine. It’s a rocking chair made out of an unknown wood, inlaid with some mother of pear and it features some interesting carved and turned details.

In 2004, we toured Lebanon and then went back to Damascus for a week. Damascus is one of my favourite cities in the world. It is an extraordinary place where you can trip over Soviet-inspired architecture from the 1950s and 60s next to some amazing bits of modernism up against the old city. The whole city, while huge, is surprisingly walkable and we spent our time poking around, touring old houses, finding interesting museums, hanging out in the tea and coffee houses and shopping – spices and door knockers was what I was after. On Straight Street, the Roman road roofed over by the Ottomans, we stopped in front of a shop to look at a rocking chair in the window. It wasn’t a design we’d seen before. We made a note to come back when the shop was open.

The next day we were passing by and stopped to look at the chair again and while looking the owner popped his head out and asked us if he could help us and invited us in for coffee. In any other country that’s the prelude to a sales job on the shop’s wares and it can be difficult to extricate yourself with any sense of dignity or politeness. In Syria, we had learned on a previous trip that coffee is just coffee and so, happy to rest the feet we accepted.

We chatted about the shop and the chair and about how much we liked the city. I also mentioned how much the city had changed in the few years since our last visit. It was a noticeable change with mobile phones, billboards, new cars – on our earlier visit while the elder Assad was still alive, the city was awash in ancient vehicles much like Cuba and was wrapped in a palatable fear.

Our host agreed and was happy to talk about the changes, albeit slow, being made and how he was hopeful for the future. He just wished reforms would happen faster. We stayed for more coffee and quite enjoyed our time in the shop. When we went back in a couple of days to buy the chair, it was more coffee (cardamon is ground with the coffee bean for a lovely drink) and conversation. We sat and talked about all sorts of topics, including lots of politics which was completely not possible on the previous trip in the 1990s, all while the chair was being cocooned in bubble wrap for its journey.

The chair made it home in one piece and it sits in the bay window upstairs. I look at it and think about the shop and the coffee and the time spent with the owner. I wonder whether the shop has, or can survive both the civil war and the encroachment of ISIS on the outskirts of the city.

As I think about the shop, I can’t help but reflect on how the government is determined to do the least possible for the refugees fleeing the conflict in Syria and the region. Listening to various government ministers, spokespeople, and mouth pieces trying to explain why they can’t do more is enough to make your head explode.

Maybe they all need to get out in the world a bit more and meet real people.

Upcoming Walks

Here are a few walks coming up in July and August.

July 22nd. Strathcona
Meet at the corner of Princess and Keefer in front of the community centre

We haven’t done a Strathcona walk in sometime and a lot has happened in the neighbourhood. We’ll be looking at neighbourhood history and new developments.

August 12th. The West End
Meet at the corner of Thurlow and Pendrell

On this walk we’ll be looking at the history of Burnaby and Harwood Streets once two of the more popular streets in the neighbourhood. Along with the Salsburys and Bell Irvings the streets were home to a interesting cross section of residents.

Exploring The Other Waterfront: The River District

The North Arm of the Fraser River is the city’s other, and unappreciated, waterfront. Industry still occupies much of the shoreline and log booms, barges and tugs make for a fascinating and changing parade of activity.

At the foot of Kerr Street, the view was once dominated by the operations of the Dominion and White Pine Sawmills. But since their closure, and after years of planning, a new community is emerging. On this series of walks we’ll be exploring the River District and surrounding area looking at the planning and history of the edge of the river.

Sundays: July 19, and August 9. 10:00am
Meet at the corner of East Kent Road South and Kerr Street
Cost: $10.00 (no registration necessary)

Hastings Mill has a great weekend coming up.

Hope you are enjoying this wonderful early summer weather as much as we are at the Mill!  For your interest and enjoyment, we have back-to-back events upcoming the weekend of June 13th/14th.

Saturday, June 13th, 2 p.m. – Hastings Mill Store and the Great Vancouver Fire of 1886.
Hear Vancouver author and Native Daughter Lisa Anne Smith describe just how close Hastings Mill Store came to being destroyed by the Great Vancouver Fire of June 13, 1886.  Precisely 129 years and zero hours after that fateful afternoon, learn through historic photos, maps and commentary how most of the newly incorporated city of Vancouver burned to the bare earth, but somehow managed to spare Hastings Mill Store and townsite.  Discover the prominent role played by the store, mill and citizens from all walks of life in a massive rebuilding effort that saw Vancouver rise from the ashes within weeks of destruction.  Entry by donation, wheelchair accessible, light refreshments.

Sunday, June 14th, 1 – 4 p.m. – Bergamasca Ensemble
Enjoy music of the Renaissance and Baroque periods as well as more modern works amidst the Mill artifacts.  Members of Bergamasca play a variety of period instruments, such as German-made Hopf Renaissance recorders, Moeck Baroque recorders and Swiss Kung contrabass.  You may hear works from early composers such as Agricola, Bach, Taverner, Rossi, as well as a variety of works pre-dating 1800. For further information on the Bergamasca Ensemble, visit www.bergamasca.webs.com.  Entry by donation, wheelchair accessible.

Summer hours are coming soon!  Beginning June 16, we will be open Tuesday – Sunday, 1 – 4 p.m.  Watch for further details on our popular summer open house evenings.