Chinatown · History · urban design · Vancouver

The Neighbourhood That Saved Vancouver

Today, Vancouver is praised for its record of good planning and livability, but it wasn’t always so. In the 1950s planners and politicians saw the east side neighbourhoods as a threat to the well being of the city and they set out to wipe out the blight. From the 1957 redevelopment report: “…delay is expensive.… Continue reading The Neighbourhood That Saved Vancouver

Chinatown · History · urban design · Vancouver

Considering Chinatown: boundaries, impacts and going slow & messy

Chinatown’s boundary has been shaped by many factors beyond the community’s control. Industry on False Creek, rail yards, ship yards crowded the southern edge. In the 1960s the edge is defined by the freeway planning that creates the Georgia and Dunsmuir Viaducts. To the east, urban renewal truncates the neighbourhood at Gore removing businesses, clan associations… Continue reading Considering Chinatown: boundaries, impacts and going slow & messy

History · Pacific Northwest · urban design · Vancouver

The First Chinook Street Name

At their November 29, 2016 meeting City Council approved the recommendations of the Civic Assets Naming Committee to name a new road in the redevelopment of the Arbutus Shopping Centre as Lahb Avenue. Lahb is Chinook for the Arbutus tree. This is the first Chinook word used for a street in Vancouver. This approval continues the… Continue reading The First Chinook Street Name

Chinatown · History · urban design · Vancouver

Chinatown: the freeway didn’t kill it but the zoning just might…

Declared a provincial historic area in the 1970s and a national historic district in 2011, Chinatown is recognized for its significant contribution to British Columbia and Canada. The Chinatown Gate, spanning Pender west of Carrall Street, welcomes visitors and Vancouverites to the district. The never ending parade of tour busses in the summer months attest… Continue reading Chinatown: the freeway didn’t kill it but the zoning just might…